Resort Latitude Zero

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The Resort Latitude Zero is set within a natural coconut garden on its own paradise island. The beautiful sandy beach around the headland where the resort sits is lapped by clear, calm, aqua-toned waters with no offshore fringing reef, making it perfect for boat access, open water swimming and relaxing. The main building consists of a modest complex of two beautiful pole-construction, timber Queenslander-style buildings. A separate open kitchen and dining gazebo sits between the two houses, overlooking a 7x14 meter in-ground infinity swimming pool. The Resort Latitude Zero looks down to the beach and natural boat harbour, where speedboats await at floating pontoons just offshore.

Location

The Telo Islands, also known as Batu Islands, consist of three large main islands and some 48 smaller islets. Located on the equator (at latitude zero degrees), the Telos are situated between Pulau Nias and the Mentawai Islands. This places them strategically in the centre of an archipelago stretching along the west coast of Sumatra, an area, which over the last decade, has become one of the great surfing meccas of the world.

The Telo Islands have been blessed with a variety of waves suitable for all levels of surfer. Beginners, cruisers, long boarders, stand up paddle boarders, advanced short board surfers and even professionals all find waves they love here. There are over 40 quality waves in the area, all of them accessible via fast speedboat from the Resort Latitude Zero resort.

The waves are consistently 3-5 foot, significantly increasing in size when larger swells roll up the Indian Ocean from an area some 3,000nm southward known as the Roaring Forties. There are high quality lefts and rights – though what makes the area a bit different and uncharacteristic for Indonesia, is a surplus of rights over lefts. There are many less intense deepwater waves to suit long-boarders, SUPs and those not quite up to risking life and limb riding monster barrels. There are also plenty of shallower, across-the-reef-style barreling waves that can’t be called anything but world-class setups.

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