Zero Ice Mile

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Locations of the Ice Sevens swims around the world, governed and ratified by the International Ice Swimming Association

noun - A Zero Ice Mile or an Ice Zero Mile is a solo ice mile performed in water temperature below 1ºC (33.8°F) as defined and ratified by the International Ice Swimming Association.

Ice Miles

Ice Miles are an officially recognized non-wetsuit ice swim by a solo individual held in water 5ºC (41ºF) or less ratified by the International Ice Swimming Association without the benefit of use of a neoprene cap or any other aid other than a swimsuit, swim cap, and ear plugs. Its shorter equivalent is the Ice Kilometer.

Origin

The term was coined by Ram Barkai of the international Ice Swimming Association in 2011.

Zero Ice Mile Swimmers

An Ice Zero Swimmer is an individual who has completed an ice swim of at least one statute mile in water temperature below 1°C (33.8°F). As of December 2020, these individuals have completed an Ice Zero Swim as certified by the International Ice Swimming Association:

Zero Ice Miles in Antarctica

Other Zero Ice Miles around the World

  • Henri Kaarma (Estonia) on 16 December 2012 in Tyumen, Russia in 0.3°C water and -33.0°C air in 25 minutes 25 seconds (1.37 miles or 1.66 km) at the age of 47
  • Aleksandr Brylin (Russia) on 16 December 2012 in Tyumen, Russia in 0.3°C water and -33.0°C air in 1 hour 5 minutes 6 seconds (1.37 miles or 2.2 km) at the age of 45
  • Andrey Sychyovv (Russia) on 16 December 2012 in Tyumen, Russia in 0.3°C water and -33.0°C air in 1 hour 6 minutes 30 seconds (1.37 miles or 2.2 km) at the age of 55
  • Ram Barkai (South Africa) on 23 March 2013 in Murmansk, Russia in 0.0°C water and 0.0°C air in 32 minutes 43 seconds (1.61 km) at the age of 64
  • Kieron Palframan (South Africa) on 23 March 2013 in Murmansk, Russia in 0.0°C water and 0.0°C air in 31 minutes 0 seconds (1.61 km) at the age of 47
  • Ryan Stramrood (South Africa) on 23 March 2013 in Murmansk, Russia in 0.0°C water and 0.0°C air in 30 minutes 0 seconds (1.61 km) at the age of 48
  • Henri Kaarma (Estonia) on 23 March 2013 in Murmansk, Russia in 0.0°C water and 0.0°C air in 33 minutes 0 seconds (1.34 miles or 2.16 km) at the age of 47
  • Henri Kaarma (Estonia) on 15 December 2013 in Tyumen, Russia in 0.0°C water and 0.0°C air in 41 minutes 47 seconds (1.49 miles or 2.4 km) at the age of 47
  • Ger Kennedy (Ireland) on 16 January 2016 in Wild Water Armagh Pool, Ireland in 0.77°C water and 4.0°C air in 32 minutes 30 seconds (1.61 km) at the age of 52
  • Jaimie Monahan (USA) on 18 December 2016 in Tyumen, Russia in -0.03°C water and -31.00°C air in 30 minutes 20 seconds (1.03 miles 1.66 km) at the age of 42
  • Ger Kennedy (Ireland) on 9 December 2017 in Tyumen, Russia in 0.5°C water and -18.8°C air in 43 minutes 10 seconds (1.25 miles or 2.01 km) at the age of 52
  • Kate Steels (Great Britain) on 24 December 2017 in South Lake, Shuangyashan City, China in 0.9°C water and -22.1°C air in 35 minutes 5 seconds (1.01 miles or 1.63 km) at the age of 52
  • Annabel Médard (France) on 13 February 2021 in Surfplas Reeuwijk, Netherlands in 0.76°C water and -17.90°C air in 52 minutes 24 seconds (1.61 km) at the age of 42
  • Jerwin Tholen (Netherlands) on 13 February 2021 in Reeuwijkse Plas, Netherlands in 0.76°C water and -17.90°C air in 37 minutes 5 seconds (1.61 km) at the age of 49
  • Antti Mäkinen (Finland) on 22 January 2022 in Ollilantie 12, Kyrö, Finland in -0.60°C water and -13.00°C air in 28 minutes 19 seconds (1.61 km at 60.70°N latitude) at the age of 29

Ice Sevens

The Ice Sevens is the ice swimming equivalent of the Oceans Seven. To achieve the Ice Sevens, a swimmer must complete an Ice Mile in an open body of water under standard ice swimming rules (i.e., no wetsuit and no neoprene hat) in the following locations, ratified by the International Ice Swimming Association:

o An Ice Mile swum below 5ºC (41ºF) in any location in Europe
o An Ice Mile swum below 5ºC (41ºF) in any location in Oceania
o An Ice Mile swum below 5ºC (41ºF) in any location in Asia
o An Ice Mile swum below 5ºC (41ºF) in any location in North America
o An Ice Mile swum below 5ºC (41ºF) in any location in Africa
o An Ice Mile swum below 5ºC (41ºF) in any location in South America
o An Ice Mile swum below 5ºC (41ºF) in any Polar location at 60º south or below or 70º north or above
o One of the seven Ice Miles must be a documented Zero Ice Mile (defined as a solo mile swim performed at below 1ºC)

Ice Sevens

American ice swimmer Jaimie Monahan of New York completed the first documented Ice Sevens in history with the following Ice Miles:

  • 1 in Europe on 2 April 2016 in Reykjavík, Iceland in 3.70°C water (3°C wind chill + 5.6°C air) in 35 minutes 0 seconds in the sea with 12 km/hr wind speed
  • 2 in Asia (Ice Zero Mile) on 18 December 2016 in Tyumen, Russia in -0.03°C water (-31°C wind chill + air) in 30:20 in an ice pool cut into a frozen lake
  • 3 in Africa on 13 February 2017 in Aguelmame Sidi Ali Lake, Morocco in 4.9°C water (-0.5°C wind chill + 3°C air) in 32:18 in a mountain lake with 14 km/hr wind speed
  • 4 within Arctic Circle on 4 March 2017 in Mikkelvik Brygge, Karlsøy, Norway in 2.37°C water (-3.5°C air) in 32:09 in the sea with 4 km/hr wind speed
  • 5 in North America on 9 March 2017 at M Street Beach, Boston, USA in 4.63°C water (6.1°C wind chill + 9°C air) in 26:16 in the sea with 20 km/hr wind speed
  • 6 in Oceania on 15 May 2017 in Tasman Lake, Aoraki Mt. Cook, New Zealand in 2.37°C water (14°C air) in 26:44 in a glacier lake
  • 7 in South America on 2 July 2017 in Ushuaia, Argentina in 4.76°C water (5.9°C air) in 29:05 in the Beagle Channel

Antarctica Polar Zero Ice Mile


Ger Kennedy complete a Polar Zero Ice Mile in 0.5ºC water and 2.0ºC air temperature in Paradise Bay, Antarctica in February 2020.

Synonyms

Ice Zero, Ice Zero Swim, Ice Zero Mile

2020 World Open Water Swimming Offering of the Year Nomination

Zero Ice Miles were completed in the Antarctica 2020 International Swim that was nominated for the 2020 WOWSA Awards in the World Open Water Swimming Offering of the Year category with the following nomination: The Southern Ocean is at the bottom of the world surrounding the continent of Antarctica. Inhospitable to humans, but remarkably, Ger Kennedy organized a series of ice swims accessible around the ice-covered tundra to some of the most hardened ice swimmers on the planet. Antarctica 2020 International Swim was held inside the Antarctic Circle to celebrate Lynne Cox's pioneering Antarctica swim in 2002 and enable people to swim short distances or Polar Ice Miles. From Argentina, the Polar Swimming Quest set off by ship and stopped in the Bellingshausen Sea and the Weddell Sea over a few weeks. 12 swimmers entered the cold waters of Antarctica with bioprene only with three major swims safely recorded. Paul Eugen Dorin Georgescu set a world record in Hanusse Bay in 0.0°C water with 22 minute 44 second Zero Ice Mile. Two days later, Ger Kennedy swam another Zero Ice Mile in Paradise Bay in 0.53°C water and -1.10°C air in 34 minutes 2 seconds, and Cath Pendleton followed up 10 days later in Hanusse Bay with a 32:54 Zero Ice Mile in 0.03°C water and -3.2°C air. For safely organizing swims by Kathryn Pratschke, Redy Redfern, Dee Newell, Jane Hardy, Tiffiny Quinn, Michelle White, Una Campbell, Martina Ring, Anne O'Donovan, Matías Ola, and Alice Kelliher in Antarctica with the help of Sean Cullen and Dimcea Lulian Zamfir, for encouraging marine conservation awareness while encountering challenging conditions, and for enabling the extension of the known physical boundaries for everyone involved, the Antarctica 2020 International Swim by Ger Kennedy is a worthy nominee for the 2020 World Open Water Swimming Offering of the Year.

External links